Gulab Jamun

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Get not one but two Gulab Jamun recipes with my step-by-step photo guide that will help you to make perfect gulab jamun every time.

gulab jamun served in a white bowl on a white napkin

What is Gulab Jamun

Gulab Jamun is a very popular Indian sweet. There are some versions of making it with khoya, milk powder, bread or sweet potatoes.

Indeed it is a favorite Indian sweet for many of us. In parties, weddings and even in an Indian dinner meal, gulab jamun happens to be one of the sweets served after the meals.

These soft sugar syrup soaked balls are a treat always. Sometimes to satisfy our sweet cravings, I make gulab jamun.

The word “gulab jamun” means rose berries. In Hindi language, the word “gulab” means rose and “jamun” is a darkish purple berry (java plum, black plum) available in India.

The sugar syrup for gulab jamun is flavoured with rose water and the fried dough balls have a size similar to jamun berries – hence the term Gulab Jamun.

It is made traditionally with dried milk solids. These dried milk solids are also called as khoya or mawa in Hindi. An easy version is also made with milk powder.

In this recipe post I am sharing both the versions.

  • Gulab Jamun made with Khoya – Traditional method for the best taste and a soft melt in the mouth texture.
  • Gulab Jamun made with Milk Powder – Easy and handy recipe if you don’t have khoya.

Both the recipes are easy and even beginners can make these tried and tested delicious melt in the mouth gulab jamun. You can choose the method depending on the ingredients you have.

About This Recipe

Authentically and traditionally Gulab Jamun recipe is always made with khoya. Khoya or mawa is the Hindi term for evaporated milk solids. It is made by continuously simmering the milk on a low heat until most of the moisture evaporates.

There are 3 different types of khoya that you get in the Indian market. To make gulab jamun recipe you need to use “chikna khoya” or “dhaap khoya”. The word ‘chikna’ means smooth. Thus basically this khoya has a smooth and soft texture. It has more moisture than the other two varieties of khoya viz ‘danedar khoya’ and ‘batti khoya’.

You can easily make chikna khoya at home. You can check the method of making khoya at this link -> Khoya Recipe. You can also buy khoya from a Indian sweet shop.

My gulab jamun recipe is an easy one that yields delicious, soft and tasty jamun. My recipe is adapted from my cooking school which I have been making for decades and has never failed.

In fact I have made this gulab jamun recipe numerous times. Besides khoya you will also need paneer to make the jamun. The addition of these two ingredients gives a soft texture.

Step-by-Step Guide

How to make Gulab Jamun (Traditional Recipe)

Get my easy pictorial guide below to make this best gulab jamun recipe!

Making the dough

1. Take 1 cup khoya or mawa (200 grams) in a bowl. Soft khoya also known as ‘daap ka khoya’ or ‘chikna khoya’ is used. This is a soft khoya, so it mashes and kneads very well.

khoya in a mixing bowl

2. Mash it very well. There should be no lumps or small bits or pieces in the khoya. You can also grate and then mash the khoya. Do not mash too much. Just mash and proceed with the next step.

mashed khoya

3. Then add ¾ cup or 100 grams grated paneer, fine rava (semolina), 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour, ¼ teaspoon baking powder and ½ teaspoon cardamom powder to the mashed khoya.

There should be no lumps in both the mawa and paneer. If there are lumps, then the texture is not even and smooth. The bits and pieces of mawa or paneer give a bite while eating.

flour and other ingredients added

4. Mix well.

ingredients mixed

5. Add 1 tablespoon milk and gather together to form a dough with milk. Don’t knead. Just gently mix. If you are unable to form balls or if the mixture appears dry, then add a few teaspoons of milk and mix again. Cover the dough and set aside for 30 minutes.

dough formed

Making sugar solution

6. Mix 1.75 cups (250 grams) sugar in 1 cup water.

sugar and water

7. On a medium-low flame, heat the sugar solution till it becomes sticky. You just need to switch off the fire before the syrup reaches a one thread consistency. I have used raw sugar which made the syrup have a dark color.

The syrup should be sticky and not watery. You can even cook the sugar syrup till it reaches a half-string consistency.

sugar syrup made

8. Add rose water and stir. Set the sugar solution aside. On cooling, if the sugar syrup crystallizes, then just add 2 to 3 tablespoons water and warm the syrup again. Stir while warming the syrup. The sugar crystals will disappear.

rose water added

Shaping and Frying

9. After 30 minutes, make small balls from the dough without cracks. Cover the dough balls and set aside.

made dough balls

10. Heat oil until it is medium-hot. Lower the flame to a medium-low or low and wait for a minute. Then gently place the dough balls in the oil.

If in case, the dough balls breaks when frying, then add some more maida (about 1 to 2 tablespoons) to the dough. Mix gently again. Set aside for fifteen minutes. Then later fry.

You can also check one small piece before frying the rest of the balls. If it breaks, then use the tip mentioned above.

fry the gulab jamun dough balls

11. Once they start to have tiny golden spots, keep on rotating them in the oil, so that the balls are evenly browned. Since I was taking the photos, I browned a few of them more.

frying until golden

12. Remove the fried dough balls and then place them on kitchen paper towels to remove extra oil.

fried balls placed on paper towels

Soaking in sugar syrup

13: Place the hot fried dough balls in the sugar syrup. Continue to fry the rest of the dough balls in batches. Later place them while still hot in the sugar syrup.

fried gulab jamun balls added into sugar syrup

14. When all the gulab jamun are placed in the sugar syrup, then keep the whole pan on a low flame for 1 to 2 minutes, till the jamun become soft. Heating helps the jamun to absorb the syrup and become soft.

The gulab jamun increases a bit in size. Don’t overcook as then they can break. Use a large pan, so that the fried jamun balls are not overcrowded and you can easily stir them gently while they are simmering.

sugar syrup with gulab jamun being simmered

15. Serve gulab jamun warm or at room temperature. You can also chill them and serve them cold. Garnish them with rose petals or almond slivers.

gulab jamun halved with a spoon on white plate

About Milk Powder Version

This gulab jamun recipe made with milk powder is a cheat’s version but tastes equally good. This recipe comes handy if you don’t have khoya or paneer readily available.

All you need is milk powder, curd (yogurt), sugar and water to make tasty gulab jamun at home.

milk powder gulab jamun in a white bowl

This version made with milk powder is soft, melt in the mouth and taste delicious with a milky taste.

For making these it is important to get the right texture in the jamun dough. If you get it right, then making them is a cakewalk and you won’t feel like buying them from outside.

I have mentioned all the tips and suggestions in the steps which can become a bit tricky, if not rightly done. So please take your time to read each step carefully. 

Step-by-Step Guide

Step-by-step Milk Powder Gulab Jamun

Making sugar syrup

1. First stir the sugar, water, cardamom powder and saffron in a pan and keep it on fire. I have kept the cardamoms peels and these can be discarded when serving.

sugar, water, flavorings in a pan

2. Gently bring to a boil and continue to stir occasionally.

sugar solution being simmered

3. Add some pistachios in the syrup. An optional step but tastes good. Make a thick syrup and switch off the fire much before the sugar solution reaches a one thread consistency.

You can cook the sugar syrup till it reaches a half string consistency. On cooling, if the sugar syrup crystallizes, then just add 2 to 3 tablespoons water and warm the syrup again. It will again return to a liquid state.

pistachios added

Preparing milk powder dough

4. Mix the 1 cup milk powder, ¼ cup all-purpose flour or maida, a pinch of baking soda, a pinch of salt (optional) in a mixing bowl. Add 1 teaspoon oil OR ½ teaspoon ghee and 1 to 2 tablespoons fresh curd or yogurt.

milk powder, flour, curd, baking soda, ghee in a mixing bowl

5. Just mix everything lightly. Add some more curd if the mixture looks dry. Don’t over mix or knead. You don’t want gluten to form, so just mixing well is enough.

The all-purpose flour is just added to bind the mixture. If gluten forms then the dough balls become dense and won’t absorb any of the sugar syrup and the jamun will not be soft.

milk powder dough ready

6. The mixture will be sticky but smooth. Apply some oil on your palms and make small balls from the dough. These dough balls almost double when frying and also increase when soaked in the sugar syrup. So don’t make large sized balls.

There should be no cracks on the dough balls. They should be smooth. If there are cracks, then just add some 1 or 2 teaspoons of curd or milk to the mixture and continue making the balls. Once done, then cover the balls with a kitchen towel.

small dough balls made

Frying

7. Heat oil for deep frying in a kadai or a pan. When the oil becomes medium hot, lower the flame. Add a small ball in the oil. The ball should slowly rise to the top from the bottom.

If it does not rise then, the oil is not hot enough. If it rises quickly and browns also quickly, then the oil is too hot to fry.

If the small ball does not crack or break while frying, you are alright to proceed further. If it cracks, then just add some 1 or 2 teaspoons flour to the dough and form the balls again.

In an ideal case, the dough ball should not crack and should rise slowly to the top and should not get browned quickly.

testing a small piece of dough ball

8. When you know the oil is hot enough and on a low flame or medium-low flame, then add 3 to 4 balls or more depending on the capacity of your kadai or pan. The balls have to be stirred with a slotted spoon frequently to get even browning.

If there are handles on the pan, you can just lightly shake the pan so that the balls are evenly fried without using the spoon. But take care as hot oil is there in the pan. The balls should also not become browned too soon. They have to be cooked from the insides too.

frying gulab jamun

9. Keep on turning until they become golden. If the oil becomes cold, then don’t fry the balls. Increase the temperature and then fry.

Otherwise, they would have a hard crisp thick cover when fried in a less hot oil and they won’t absorb the sugar syrup. Plus they would absorb a lot of oil too.

frying until golden in color

10. When the balls are evenly golden and browned, remove from the slotted spoon and add them directly into the sugar syrup. Keep them in the sugar syrup for at least 1 to 2 hours before serving.

This is done so that they soaks up the sugar syrup which will make them soft and sweet. That’s why in the mithai shops, the gulab jamun are always soaked in sugar syrup.

If you feel the jamun is not soaking in the sugar syrup, then warm the entire sugar syrup with the jamuns for a couple of minutes on stove-top. Cover and keep aside. Just warm them, don’t heat.

gulab jamun placed in sugar syrup

11. Gulab jamun can be served warm or cold. If they are at room temperature, then warm in the microwave and serve them topped with sugar syrup and garnished with pistachios or almond slices.

gulab jamun served in a white bowl

Variations

There are many variations of gulab jamun. The variations vary with the ingredients used or the cooking technique applied. Some of the variations that I have already shared are:

Tips

Tips + FAQs

I have compiled below tips and frequently asked questions based upon the queries received from the readers in the comments section.

Why my gulab jamun breaks on frying

  • If there is too much moisture in the dough, the jamun will break in the oil.
  • More baking powder can also result in the jamun breaking and disintegrating in oil.
  • When frying the temperature should not be too high or too low. A higher or a too low temperature of oil while frying can also break or crack the gulab jamun.
  • If the binding ingredients like maida or rava (sooji) are less, then this can also break jamun when frying.
  • As soon as you add the jamun dough balls in the oil, then let them become slightly crisp and then only turn them.
  • When making jamun dough ball, there should be no cracks on it. If you see cracks then add some more milk in the dough mixture. Mix and then form the jamun again.

Why has gulab jamun become hard

  • If there is less moisture in the jamun, it may become hard.
  • The jamun dough has to be mixed and not kneaded. If the dough is kneaded then the gulab jamun will become hard. When you knead the dough, gluten strands will form which will make the jamun dense and heavy.

    Even if they are slightly dense they won’t absorb the syrup and thus remain hard. In fact when frying gulab jamun, it should feel like very light spongy balls. You will feel the lightness in them.

Why my gulab jamun is too soft

  • The sugar syrup should have a sticky consistency. They should not have a watery consistency. If the sugar syrup is watery, then the jamun absorbs more sugar syrup resulting in it being super soft and can even break in the sugar syrup.

How to perfectly fry the dough balls

  • First, the oil has to be heated till it is medium hot. Then reduce flame to a medium-low or low and wait for a minute. Then gently place the jamun dough balls in the oil.

    Once the jamun dough balls start to have tiny light golden spots on them, then keep on rotating them with a slotted spoon in the oil often. This way the jamun will have an even golden color.
  • Also do note that if the oil is on the cooler side, then the jamun will absorb more oil and can crack or break too.
  • If the oil is very hot, then the balls get browned quickly with the inside portion being under cooked.
  • Traditionally gulab jamun are fried in ghee. You can go the traditional way if you want or just fry them in oil as I have done.

More Awesome Indian Sweets!

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gulab jamun served in a white bowl

Gulab Jamun

Delicious gulab jamun recipe made with khoya (mawa) and paneer in the traditional way.
4.9 from 55 votes
Prep Time 35 mins
Cook Time 10 mins
Total Time 45 mins
Cuisine North Indian
Course Desserts, Sweets
Diet Vegetarian
Difficulty Level Easy
Servings 20 gulab jamun
Units

Ingredients

for the dough

  • 1 cup khoya or mawa – 200 grams
  • ¾ cup grated paneer – 100 grams of paneer (Indian cottage cheese)
  • 3 tablespoon all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoon fine sooji (rava or semolina)
  • 4 green cardamoms – powdered in a mortar-pestle or ½ teaspoon cardamom powder
  • 1 tablespoon milk or add as required
  • ¼ teaspoon baking powder
  • oil for deep frying – as required

for sugar syrup

  • 1.75 cups sugar – 250 grams
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon rose water
  • 1 tablespoon milk (optional) – read notes

Instructions
 

Making dough

  • Take khoya (mawa or evaporated milk) in a bowl. Mash it very well. There should be no lumps. You can also grate and then mash the khoya.
  • Then add grated paneer, rava (sooji), all purpose flour (maida), baking powder and cardamom powder to the mashed khoya. There should be no lumps in both the mawa and paneer.
  • As if they are there, then you will find the texture of the gulab jamun not so good. The bits and pieces of mava or paneer will give a bite in the mouth, when you have the gulab jamun. They won’t be smooth.
  • Mix well. Add milk and gather together to form a dough with milk. Don’t knead.
  • Just gently mix. If you are unable to form balls or if the mixture appears dry, then add a few teaspoons of milk. Cover the dough and keep aside for 30 mins.
  • Make small balls from the dough. Cover the balls and keep aside.

Making sugar syrup

  • Dissolve sugar in water. Heat the sugar solution till it become sticky. You just need to switch off the fire before the syrup reaches a one thread consistency.
  • Add rose water and stir. Keep the sugar solution aside. On cooling if the sugar syrup crystallizes, then just add 2 to 3 tbsp water and warm the syrup again. It will again return to a liquid state.

Frying

  • Meanwhile, while the sugar syrup is cooking, heat oil till its medium hot. Lower the flame and wait for a minute. Then gently place the dough balls in the oil.
  • Once they start to have tiny golden spots, keep on rotating them in the oil, so that the jamun are evenly browned.
  • Remove the fried jamun and then drain them on kitchen paper towels to remove excess oil.

Making gulab jamun

  • Then place the hot fried dough balls in the sugar syrup. Continue frying the rest of the dough balls in batches.
  • When all the jamuns are placed in the sugar syrup, then keep the whole pan with the sugar syrup and the gulab jamun, on a low flame for 1 to 2 minutes till the jamun become soft.
  • Heating helps the gulab jamun to absorb the syrup and become soft. The jamun increase a bit in size. Don’t overcook as then the jamun can break.
  • Use a large pan, so that the jamuns are not overcrowded and you can easily stir them gently while they are simmering.
  • Serve gulab jamun warm or at room temperature. You can also chill them and serve them cold. Garnish with rose petals or almond slivers.

Notes

1. Gulab jamun falls apart while frying: The jamuns will fall apart of break in oil, If there is too much moisture in the dough. More baking powder in the dough can also result in the same. Frying at a very high heat or a low heat will result in the jamuns cracking or falling apart. If the dough has less binding ingredients like all purpose flour or rava (sooji), this would break them in the oil. While frying as soon as you add the jamun dough balls in the oil, then let them become slightly crisp, firm up and then only turn them.
2. Dense gulab jamuns: Less moisture in the jamun dough will make them hard and dense. The jamun dough has to be mixed and not kneaded. If the dough is kneaded then the gulab jamun will become chewy. When you knead the dough, gluten strands will form which will make the jamun dense and heavy.
3. Very soft gulab jamuns: The sugar syrup should have a sticky consistency. They should not have a watery consistency. If the sugar syrup is watery, then the jamun absorbs more sugar syrup resulting in it being super soft and can even break in the sugar syrup.
4. Tip to remove sugar impurities: If the sugar syrup has impurities, then add milk and simmer. A layer of scum will be formed. Remove this layer with a spoon.
5. Frying Notes
  • First, the oil has to be heated till it is medium hot. Then reduce flame to a medium-low or low and wait for a minute. Then gently place the jamun dough balls in the oil.
  • Once the jamun dough balls start to have tiny light golden spots on them, then keep on rotating them with a slotted spoon in the oil often. This way the jamun will have an even golden color.
  • Also do note that if the oil is on the cooler side, then the jamun will absorb more oil and can crack or break too.
  • If the oil is very hot, then the balls get browned quickly with the inside portion being under cooked.
  • Traditionally gulab jamun are fried in ghee. You can go the traditional way if you want or just fry them in oil as I have done.

Nutrition Info (Approximate values)

Nutrition Facts
Gulab Jamun
Amount Per Serving (1 gulab jamun)
Calories 126 Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value*
Fat 5g8%
Saturated Fat 2g13%
Cholesterol 5mg2%
Sodium 30mg1%
Potassium 16mg0%
Carbohydrates 17g6%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 12g13%
Protein 3g6%
Vitamin A 46IU1%
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) 1mg67%
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 1mg59%
Vitamin B3 (Niacin) 1mg5%
Vitamin B6 1mg50%
Vitamin B12 1µg17%
Vitamin C 1mg1%
Vitamin D 1µg7%
Vitamin E 1mg7%
Vitamin K 1µg1%
Calcium 99mg10%
Vitamin B9 (Folate) 5µg1%
Iron 1mg6%
Magnesium 2mg1%
Phosphorus 9mg1%
Zinc 1mg7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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gulab jamun recipe

Milk Powder Gulab Jamun

The gulab jamun recipe made with milk powder is a cheat’s version but tastes equally good. All you need is milk powder, curd, sugar and water to make a tasty gulab jamun.
4.8 from 30 votes
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 50 mins
Cuisine North Indian
Course Sweets
Diet Vegetarian
Difficulty Level Easy
Servings 14 gulab jamun
Units

Ingredients

For the Jamun

  • 1 cup milk powder
  • ¼ cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon oil OR ½ teaspoon ghee
  • 1 pinch salt (optional)
  • 1 pinch baking soda
  • 1 to 2 tablespoon s Curd (yogurt)
  • some blanched pistachios or almond slices for garnishing

For the sugar syrup

  • 1 cup water
  • 1.5 cups sugar
  • 3 to 4 green cardamoms – husked and crushed or powdered or ½ teaspoon cardamom powder
  • 1 pinch saffron – optional
  • 1 tablespoon rose water – optional

Instructions
 

Making dough balls

  • First stir the sugar, water, cardamom powder and saffron in a pan and keep it on fire. I have kept the cardamoms peels and these can be discarded when serving.
  • Gently bring to a boil and continue to stir occasionally.
  • Add some pistachios in the syrup. An optional step but tastes good. Make a thick syrup and switch off the fire much before the sugar solution reaches a one thread consistency.
  • You can cook the sugar syrup till it reaches a half string consistency. On cooling, if the sugar syrup crystallizes, then just add 2 to 3 tablespoons water and warm the syrup again. It will again return to a liquid state.
  • Mix the 1 cup milk powder, ¼ cup all-purpose flour or maida, a pinch of baking soda, a pinch of salt (optional) in a mixing bowl. Add 1 teaspoon oil OR ½ teaspoon ghee and 1 to 2 tablespoons fresh curd or yogurt.
  • Just mix everything lightly. Add some more curd if the mixture looks dry. Don’t over mix or knead.
  • You don’t want gluten to form, so just mixing well is enough. The all-purpose flour is just added to bind the mixture. If gluten forms then the dough balls become dense and won’t absorb any of the sugar syrup and the jamun will not be soft.
  • The mixture will be sticky but smooth. Apply some oil on your palms and make small balls from the dough. These dough balls almost double when frying and also increase when soaked in the sugar syrup. So don’t make large sized balls.
  • There should be no cracks on the dough balls. They should be smooth. If there are cracks, then just add some 1 or 2 teaspoons of curd or milk to the mixture and continue making the balls. Once done, then cover the balls with a kitchen towel.

Frying

  • Heat oil for deep frying in a kadai or a pan. When the oil becomes medium hot, lower the flame.
  • Add a small ball in the oil. The ball should slowly rise to the top from the bottom. If it does not rise then, the oil is not hot enough. If it rises quickly and browns also quickly, then the oil is too hot to fry.
  • If the small ball does not crack or break while frying, you are alright to proceed further. If it cracks, then just add some 1 or 2 teaspoons flour to the dough and form the balls again. In an ideal case, the dough ball should not crack and should rise slowly to the top and should not get browned quickly.
  • When you know the oil is hot enough and on a low flame or medium-low flame, then add 3 to 4 balls or more depending on the capacity of your kadai or pan.
  • The balls have to be stirred with a slotted spoon frequently to get even browning. If there are handles on the pan, you can just lightly shake the pan so that the balls are evenly fried without using the spoon. But take care as hot oil is there in the pan. The balls should also not become browned too soon. They have to be cooked from the insides too.
  • Keep on turning the balls until they become golden. If the oil becomes cold, then don’t fry the balls. Increase the temperature and then fry. Otherwise, the balls would have a hard crisp thick cover when fried in a less hot oil and they won’t absorb the sugar syrup. Plus they would absorb a lot of oil too.

Soaking jamun in sugar syrup

  • When the balls are evenly golden and browned, remove from the slotted spoon and add them directly into the sugar syrup.
  • Keep the fried golden balls in the sugar syrup for at least 1 to 2 hours before serving. This is done so that the jamun soaks up the sugar syrup which will make them soft and sweet. That’s why in the mithai shops, the gulab jamun are always soaked in sugar syrup.
  • If you feel the jamun is not soaking in the sugar syrup, then warm the whole gulab jamun along with the sugar syrup on stove-top for a couple of minutes. Cover and set aside. Just warm them, don’t heat.
  • Gulab jamun can be served warm or cold. If they are at room temperature, then warm in the microwave and serve them topped with sugar syrup and garnished with pistachios or almond slices.

Nutrition Info (Approximate values)

Nutrition Facts
Milk Powder Gulab Jamun
Amount Per Serving (1 gulab jamun)
Calories 144 Calories from Fat 27
% Daily Value*
Fat 3g5%
Saturated Fat 2g13%
Cholesterol 9mg3%
Sodium 59mg3%
Potassium 133mg4%
Carbohydrates 27g9%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 25g28%
Protein 3g6%
Vitamin A 85IU2%
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) 1mg67%
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 1mg59%
Vitamin B3 (Niacin) 1mg5%
Vitamin B6 1mg50%
Vitamin B12 1µg17%
Vitamin C 1mg1%
Vitamin D 1µg7%
Vitamin E 1mg7%
Vitamin K 1µg1%
Calcium 90mg9%
Vitamin B9 (Folate) 7µg2%
Iron 1mg6%
Magnesium 10mg3%
Phosphorus 75mg8%
Zinc 1mg7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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This recipe post from the archives (August 2014) has been republished and updated on 3rd June 2020.

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Welcome to Dassana's Veg Recipes. I share vegetarian recipes from India & around the World. Having been cooking for decades and with a professional background in cooking & baking, I help you to make your cooking journey easier with my tried and tested recipes showcased with step by step photos & plenty of tips & suggestions.

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144 Comments

  1. Hi Dassana
    I wanted to inquire about doubling the recipe. How would I go about with the amount of flour and Sooji. I did 6 Tablespoons of Maida and 4 Tablespoons of Sooji and ended up with polka dot Gulab Jamuns that resembled strawberries ???? So I guess 3 Tablespoons of Sooji would be sufficient?5 stars

    1. radha, whenever sooji is used, one has to be careful. firstly too much of sooji can make the dish hard or dense. and when sooji is added it absorbs moe moisture or water content from the mixture or batter. so here in this case, some more liquid ingredients like milk or water can be added, so that the sooji softens and does not remain crisp – nor you can see the fine dots of sooji in the dish. in this recipe, 4 tablespoons sooji will be more. so just 2.5 to 3 tablespoons. your guess is right ????

  2. Hi Dassana, Your recipes are wonderful and so spot on. I have been meaning to say this on so many posts of yours that I try- but today I am posting this as I have run into an issue and I am hoping you might be able to tell me why.
    The first time I made your Gulab jamun they were just fabulous. Then the second time ( I bought a different Khoya- this was softer) and made it and all the dumplings when I put them in the sugar syrup went in , in the middle. I had half that Khoya still- saved it up and made it again today and this happened with some and not all.
    What am I doing wrong- did I put in the dumplings too hot into the sugar syrup?
    Your recipes are so very good.. thank you for sharing them.5 stars

    1. thanks meena. i have also used softer khoya in the recipe. gulab jamuns have to be hot when adding sugar syrup. could be that the sugar syrup was either not a perfect one string consistency or the khoya must be more on softer side. what you can do is do not heat up the sugar syrup once you add them in it. just let them soak in the syrup. hope this helps.

  3. Hi Ms. Dassana,

    I have tried several recipes from your website and others but the measurements that you give are absolutely perfect. Gulab jamuns i used to make had some or the other problem but with your recipe turned great.

    Thank you for your marvellous recipes.5 stars

    1. Welcome Amera. Glad to know this. Thanks for your positive review on gulab jamun recipe.

  4. Ms Dasana, Hi!
    I do make gulab jamuns at home and they usually come out well. Your recipe with measurement along with people’s encouraging comments seems too helpful as my method is how I had seen my mom prepare when i was a child.
    Here i would like to clear a doubt. You said in one of the replies above that Baking soda can be replaced with Baking powder. But is it true? They have a different composition, aren’t they?5 stars

    1. thanks sona. glad to know. in this recipe both baking soda or baking powder can be used. does not make much of a difference as small amount is used. they do have different compositions but for recipes like gulab jamuns, pakoras, koftas etc, they can be substituted with each other.

  5. Hi dasana ,I tried gulab jamun recipe.and it was nice.i would love to try other recipe of your .4 stars

  6. Hii, i was just having one qwery… Can baking powder be replaced with baking soda?? If not then what else can be used… I m huge fans of yours and ur dishes..

    1. jyoti, in this recipe you can use baking powder instead of baking soda. and thanks a lot.

  7. I don’t know if this has been answered before.. but, what exactly is the purpose for the paneer? I have seen some other recipes with khoya which don’t add paneer.
    I made your recipe yesterday and it was amazing! I guess my Gulab Jamuns were too soft because after soaking in the syrup. They started breaking whenever I touched them with a spoon. I’ll just have to try again next month.5 stars

    1. radha, paneer gives a softer texture. the sugar syrup has to be sticky and about 1/2 string consistency. if the sugar syrup is watery, then the jamuns will break. hope this helps.

      1. Thank you so much. I made another batch and it was successful! Amazingly soft and melt in your mouth. The best recipe I have tried to date. Just fantastic. Thank you so much!5 stars

  8. Its a perfect recipe, never goes wrong, so many times i have made it, but forgot to thank you, so thanks a lot for such a sure shot recipe, i wish i could share pics of my beautiful gulab jamuns5 stars

    1. Welcome Pooja. Thanks for sharing this awesome feedback on gulab jamuns.

  9. Hi Dassana, I want to try this recipe but have a quick question….Can i use frozen khoya? We only get frozen khoya here in NZ. I will thaw it and bring it to room temperature before using. This will be the first time i’m making gulab jamuns from scratch..i’ve always bought the ready mix..so just wanted to make sure i get it right. Thank you!

    1. Welcome Yogita. You can use frozen khoya but bring it to room temperature before you use it.

  10. Hi mam..h r u? U r really great and tried ur most of ur recipes everything turned out excellent.. Tried this way of making jamuns three to four times..it turned out well..but last tym my jamuns outer layer was crispy but didn’t break anywhere.. Soaked in syrup..but I didn’t get round shapes for some of the jamuns..but while trying previous tym and all it turned very perfect..this tym ly the shape made me disappointed.. But melted in mouth..don’t know where I went wrong? It puffed up while frying with round shape and while taking from the oil the shape got changed..otherwise everything was OK and too good..thank you..

    1. thanks radhi. firstly the jamuns need to be fried in small batches. this depends on the size of the kadai. if they are fried in large numbers, the shape changes. also when soaking, there should be enough room for expansion. if the bowl size is small, the jamuns will not have a round shape. other than these, i don’t see any reason for the shape getting changed as you have mentioned that the taste and texture was good.

  11. Thank you for the awesome recipe. I followed your directions, doubled the recipe and added another tablespoon of milk. It was fantastic. I used the rosewater and it really made a huge difference.

    To anyone trying this recipe, please follow the directions. Especially on the part where you do not knead the dough. Only mix it and when forming the balls pack it in carefully.5 stars

    1. thank you anshu for this lovely feedback. rose water does make a big difference. also the recipe can be doubled easily. wish you a happy diwali.

  12. Such a perfect recipe it is..‼ …yummm gulab jamuns dat got over in no time…also noone could make out dat they r home made….can’t thank u enough mam…☺5 stars

    1. thanks divya for the positive review. good to know that that gulab jamuns got over quickly.

  13. i tried ur recipe and it turned out fantastic…
    i never had such soft and melt in mouth gulab jamuns…
    bt i want to make them a bit tight… as they are served in shops… mine were very soft… taste was awesome bt plzz suggest if there is a way to make them a bit tight so that they will retain their round circular shape…
    thanks fr posting and sharing..
    i hv also made paneer and khoya at home… and the paneer was soooooo delicious…

    1. thats great kavita and thanks for this feedback. for a firm gulab jamuns, fry them a little more and also do not heat the syrup after you keep them in it.

  14. Hi Dassana,
    I would like to let u know that I am an absolute fan of your blog .Whenever i decide to try some things new I always stick to your directions and the result is amazing as always .So thankyou so much and keep up the good work.I had made Gulab Jamuns with khoya and paneer on this Karvachauth for thr first time and they came out perfect.Even got compliments from hubby ?

    Thanks so much ?4 stars

    1. thank you priya. also thanks for sharing your feedback on the gulab jamun recipe. most welcome.

  15. awesome recipe.. have u posted the recipe of paasta if yes than plz share and if not than plzz update..

  16. I love gulabjamuns n sure with d help of ur recipe I will make it soon

  17. Hi..i have bought lasa khoya(which is specially used to make gulab jaman) so can i make gulab jaman using that lasa khoya and remainig ingrediants according to ur recipie?

  18. Thanks for the recipe. But I have a problem. My gulab jamun were soft n good to taste but were not spongy…… The syrup didn’t enter the balls well. I took 1 cup each of mashed mava and grated paneer. 1/2 cup maida and 1/4 cup sooji n added baking powder. I don’t understand what went wrong? I think I added less sooji. Why is the sooji added anyways. Help me out. I want to make it for diwali.

    1. you have a taken more of the maida and sooji. the maida is used for binding and half a cup is too much. sooji is also used for binding but also as it makes the jamuns soft. thus the jamun balls have become hard. just follow the recipe. in this recipe, you can even skip the sooji.

  19. Can u please suggest
    in one kg khoya how much suji is required…

    Thanks
    komal

    1. i am not sure how much as i have not measured the suji in grams. so for the recipe, you will have to increase everything proportionately.

  20. Hi Amit,
    I tried this Gulab jamun recipe… And it was yummy… I had also tried gravy manchurian that was amazing too… Thanks for the detailed explanation about cooking with important notes…
    Well i read in comments that some people are getting problem when balls are spreading while it was deep fried… Same thing happened with me too… And to make the dough fine again i mixed some more maida(2tbsp) in it and kept it aside for fifteen minutes and then the balls got fried perfectly without spreading at all in the pan…
    Thanks again keep cooking and sharing the delicious…5 stars

    1. thanks madhuri for the positive feedback and also for the tip you have mentioned. will help the readers. i will also mention this in the post 🙂

  21. I tried this today. But it was very soft. Can I use extra soji and maida next time.5 stars

  22. Hi,
    I am planning to make gulabjamuns tomorrow using your recipe. I have bread flour at home. Can I use bread flour instead of all purpose flour ?

    Thanks in advance. 🙂

    1. welcome kanan. i am not sure, you will have to give it a try. i have never worked with bread flour. so can’t say.

  23. I did exactly as said in the recipe starting from the homemade khoya and paneer. I had let the dough for one hour though. Just that was different from your recipe. Balls were made fried on low flame, kept on paper towel,made the syrup and put the balls in straight away and kept on low flame for a while and when we were going to serve it,it became totally crystalized. So we added water and warmed it up and served it and it still crystallized. Very disappointed! Why could this have happened?

    1. the sugar has crystallized. try adding some lemon juice in the syrup and you wont’t get crystals. also i think you cooked it again too much thats why the crystals were formed. i would also suggest not to allow the dough to sit or rest at room temperature.

  24. All who tasted the gulab jamun were pleasantly surprised and did not believe the recipe till I opened your blog and showed them. Came out really well and was worth the hard work of mashing the khoya and paneer :). Rose water added beautiful aroma and the whole package was a delight to all who tasted it. Your recipes earned some more followers and admirers. Your recipes bring out a lot of confidence in people who have thought for years that cooking is not their cup of tea. Thank you once again for your contributions in such an important part of our daily lives5 stars

    1. welcome hemanth. thanks for sharing your positive feedback. you are actually very good in cooking. because i have got some comments where few readers have not got the gulab jamun right. we feel its little tricky to make gulab jamun at home but its not. thanks for sharing the blog with your friends.

      1. But in ur recipe ingredients given above its showing 200gms of khoya and 100 GM’s of Paneer

  25. Hello
    Dasanna did try out the gulab jamum today.
    It turned out pretty good. However that some jamums started collapsing inside. Maybe due to the action of baking powder, I did follow your instructions and added 1/4 tsp , still that was the result. Otherwise the taste was excellent. When in your mouth as you bite ,I could feel the paneer taste. Can we avoid paneer.
    Thanks for the recipe.

    1. hi raveen, i could not get what you mean by collapsing inside. in this recipe paneer has to be used. if you grate or crumble the paneer very well and mix it evenly then you won’t get the paneer taste. grate paneer with a grater having small gratings.

  26. Hi Dassana tryd gulab jamuns turned out vry nice, thks for the delightful recipe.

      1. Hi, I am planning to throw a party for my 2 yr son bday. I am from Lucknow UP . I was planning to make choose , palak paneer n kalaugi. Plz can u suggest some better option. I am not sure about d combination. With this I was planning to make poori kauchaudi rice n raita. Plz suggest, it wud b a real help

        1. deepti, i don’t know what is kalaugi. palak paneer will go well with rotis or naan or tandoori roti. you can also try aloo rasedar or mathura ke dubki wale aloo with poori kachori. these aloo recipes are posted in the blog.

  27. Hi Dassana,
    I tried this recipe but must have gone wrong as the jamuns were hard. I made a few errors. Added double the amount of paneer, realised it later after mixing. I took care of ensuring a grain free dough, however the jamuns were still ‘daanedar’. Did you use store bought paneer or did you make the paneer yourself? The khoya I had was pasty not crumbly as you have mentioned. Also the chachni was made well but by the time I added the jamuns it had thickened a bit, I felt it was a bit less for the jamuns. Do the jamuns also harden if they are cooked on a slow flame (longer time)?4 stars

    1. hi deepti, sorry to hear that. we all mistakes. even i do. proportions are important. the paneer has became too much. i made the paneer at home. khoya has different textures everywhere. what i get outside is a soft textured one. the chachni thickens on cooling and even will get sugar crystals. you can either keep on a hot water bath. meaning keep the chachni pan on a large bowl or handi containing some hot water. or you can add 3 to 4 tbsp of water and warm the syrup again. for a longer time if you cook, the jamuns will get a coating or crust of the sugar syrup which will change to a 2 to 3 thread consistency and make a hard crust around the jamuns. so they will harden from outside. the syrup has to be in the same consistency throughout. some water can be added while cooking the jamuns.

      1. Hi Dassana,
        I shall try again. Next time I shall use homemade paneer how do you measure the weight in case of home made paneer? Learnt a few lessons :).
        I shall be making rasgullas tomorrow for husbands birthday. Have noted your recipe for the same.

        1. i have a weighing machine at home. so i measure in that. we all learn deepti. even i learn 🙂 have a great day tomorrow.

        2. Thanks! Can you advice if the jamuns are made first and then the syrup, will it make a difference in the texture of the jamuns? Will they harden or not swell if they cool before adding to the syrup?

        3. i make them simultaneously 🙂 first the syrup is made and then the jamuns are added while hot in the syrup. the syrup has to be warm or kept on a hot water bath. what you can do is make the balls and cover them with a moist cloth. then make the syrup. once the syrup is done, heat oil and fry the jamuns. quickly drain them and place them in the syrup.

  28. Baking powder is necessary….can I skip it
    And Without baking powder the softness will same

    1. ashwini, i buy from a local super store. there are two types of rose water. one is edible and other is meant for skin and eyes.

      1. I searched for edible rose water in 4-5 stores including Godrej Nature basket with no luck.Can i substitute it with something else or do i skip adding it to the syrup?

        1. ashwini, i also searched for rose water online, some days back. but could not get. let me know where you are based. i can let you know where you will find rose water, if you are based in mumbai or pune. instead of rose water, you can add 1/2 tsp cardamom powder along with a few crushed strands of saffron. saffron is not essential, but for fragrance you can add them. also if you have kewra water, you can add that too.

  29. Hi! Can I skip the milk? And is it necessary to let the dough rest for thirty minutes, can that be skipped as well?
    Lastly, what difference would it make if I fried the balls in ghee?

    1. sammy, you can skip the milk. you have to allow the dough to rest. you can fry the balls in ghee. the gulab jamun will have a nice aroma and flavor of ghee.

  30. This is the first time i’ve tried to make those. I used home made khoya (which I followed instructions on on your website on how to make 🙂 ). I didn’t have any paneer so I used yoghurt instead and it turned out to be really tasty. Thank you so much for your lovely recipes.5 stars

  31. I tried this recipe. Unfortunately forgot baking soda while mixing. Also had to stepout of the house so the mixed dough stayed for 3 hours in fridge. I used grated khoya and grated paneer along with Maida and Suji. The balls were very hard and did not plump up. There was a bite to them as you could feel the grated paneer. Wondering if should have put grated Khoa and Paneer in a mixie. Normally I use your other recipe with just milk powder and have received excellent comments. This time no one touched them.

    1. okay.. firstly the mixture should not have been refrigerated. did you bring it at room temperature before frying? the paneer gratings have to be fine. the khoya also has to be mashed. if the khoya is not mashed, the balls will become hard. baking soda does help in making the balls soft, but in this recipe, it can be skipped. since the paneer and mashed khoya will make the balls soft. next time you can run both the khoya and paneer in the mixer, but just take care that fat is not released from them. it will spoil the texture.

  32. Hi,
    This is the first that i tried..came out super good.The paneer was new twist to it.Many thanks for posting such a wonderful recipe5 stars

  33. Thks for the wonderful recipe, culd u also post recipe for rasgulla and jalebi please.

    1. welcome Mohini. i have noted down the recipe request and will try to post the recipes in coming months.

  34. Assalamoealikum mashallah very nice some new things for me to learn more..um head chef in restaurant…
    This is great site
    Br4 stars

  35. Can I use Riccota cheese in place of khoya after reducing the water. Also is it ok to use cottage cheese instead of regular paneer. thanks.

  36. it is a very very awesome website…. i really like it very much…… i tried our recipe it was really very nice thanks a lot for putting such nice and easy recipes for people like us…5 stars

  37. Hi,
    I tried your recipe today…but they are not that soft as i forgot to put them on flame after placing in sugar syrup.
    Is there a way they can become soft now?
    Thanks:)

    1. hi isha, warm the sugar syrup and heat lightly. they will become soft.

  38. I tried your recipe…….taste was too gud but the gulab jamun were too soft and some of them broke as we took them out from syrup. What wud b the reason..??4 stars

    1. the reason would be they got cooked too much in the last step or the dough was too moist or soft. this could be the reasons that some of them were breaking in the syrup.

  39. Hi,

    Is it possible to make these without the flour and sooji? I was looking for a gluten free version

    Thanks

    1. flour is added, even though you skip the sooji. it helps in binding. another way i would suggest is to use some other flour instead of all purpose flour or use mashed sweet potatoes. just make the balls, with khoya, mashed sweet potatoes and corn starch. this will be an experimentation and you will have to adjust the proportions accordingly.

  40. Hello Dear,

    Thank you for all the wonderful recipes. I was curious about edible rose water. Can you share what brand or how you buy or make rose water? Also, I would like to know which saffron brand you use.

    Thanks for helping.

    Thanks dear,
    Ami5 stars

    1. thanks ami. i have a syrian brand (ebla) of rose water, that i use. saffron i use an indian brand (tulip) and a spanish brand (tajmahal).

  41. Hi I live in the British Virgin Islands. I would like to make these. Can you let me know what type of yogurt I can use.

    thanks.

  42. Totally loving your site. This post has reminded me of my childhood when mom would make two huge containers one of gajar halwa andand other of gulabjamuns and Ialways liked gulabjamun. I prefer home made gulabjamun over readymade ones anyday. This recipe is a keeper.

  43. Hi samy east or west india is the best as we get khoya here for making yummy gulab jamuns which u dont get in us

  44. Heyy..your all recipes are fabulous..if I don’t wanna add paneer in gulab jamans..will it be ok?

    1. paneer is essential in this recipe. if paneer is replaced, then the whole recipe will change.

  45. Hi Dassana, I live in Spain where to find khoya is impossible. So if you may please guide me with it’s replacement and correct proportion. It would be a great help

  46. Hey I made this today….. They turned out fab and recipe is so simple and Delicious…. Thanks Dassana5 stars

  47. Dear Dassana,

    Can i use the evaporated milk that you get at the store instead of Khoya. I live in the US and Khoya is difficult to find.

    Love the recipes onthis site

    Thank You

  48. Hi Dassana,

    I have tried few recipes from the south indian cuisine section by u and they turned out quiet nice.

    This gulab jamun recipe u shared is so simple and full of flavors and i’ll for sure try it in this week.

      1. Finally made it today and they were fab… My mil used to bring ready to eat packs and make them but today i insisted her to follow your recipe. She was ok and when we made it she was like they r fab and so simple to make….

        Thanks Dassana5 stars

        1. welcome apeksha. glad to know that you and your mil liked the gulab jamuns. thanks for sharing the positive feedback.

  49. Very interesting..just yesterday my husband was complaining that I never made gulab jamuns and he was requesting for one made of khoya and today you actually post one!!!!..how can you ensure that there are no lumps in the paneer?passing it through a sieve or just running it in a mixie for few seconds?

    1. i always grate the paneer and then add. there will be no lumps then. if one uses a short cut and mashes the paneer without grating, then there will be lumps. no need to run in a mixer as this will release the fat from the paneer and change the texture of the jamuns.

        1. Another doubt…which kind of rava would you use for this recipe..chiroti rava/fine rava or bombay rava/medium coarse rava?