Aamras Recipe (Sweet Mango Pulp)

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Aamras is a popular mango delicacy from the Western Indian states of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Try this absolutely delicious aamras recipe with my step-by-step photos for an indulgent summer treat. Enjoy it as it is or with Poori (Indian fried bread).

top shot of aamras in glass bowl with a few saffron strands on top with a side of poori on a green wooden board with a text layover

What is Aamras

In Hindi the words Aam means mango and Ras means essence or extract or juice. So the word aamras means a juicy mango extract. It is also known as Keri no Ras in Gujarati language where keri means mango.

Basically aamras is simply a mango puree or pulp. You can also call it mango nectar. 

Aamras is a summer delight in a bowl. One of the dishes that I make on occasions during weekends in the Indian summers is aamras poori.

Traditionally aamras is served with Poori. This pairing known as aamras puri is liked by many people and is quite popular.

But aamras can also be eaten after a meal as a sweet dish or just about at any time. Recently a reader had also mentioned in the comments below that neer dosa can be served with aamras.

As I mentioned above, aam ras is very popular both in Gujarat and Maharashtra. In fact, in both Gujarati and Maharashtrian weddings, I have had aamras served in the thali meal.

Step-by-Step Guide

How to make Aamras Recipe

Prep Mangoes

1. Begin by rinsing 2 large alphonso mangoes thoroughly in clean water. Drain all the water and dry them with a clean kitchen towel.

Peel and chop the mangoes. Add the chopped mangoes to a blender. You can also add some sugar if the mangoes are slightly tangy or sour.

NOTE: The amount of jaggery or sugar depends on the sweetness of mangoes and your individual preference of sweetness. If the mangoes are slightly tangy, then you could add some sugar and jaggery. But if the mangoes are sweet or very sweet, you do not need to add any sweetener.

TIP: Mangoes have a heating quality. So to reduce this, soak mangoes until immersed in water in a bowl for a couple of hours. Later drain all the water, wipe them dry with a kitchen towel and begin to prep them.

chopped mangoes in a blender

Blend Mangoes

2. Then blend the mangoes to a smooth pulp. Check the taste and add sugar if required. 

To thin the consistency of aamras slightly, add some milk or water or a few ice cubes and blend again. However do not add too much of the liquids as they will make your aamras recipe into a drink.

mangoes blended to a smooth thick pulp

Make Aamras

3. Take the mango pulp in a bowl. Then add ½ teaspoon cardamom powder and 12 to 15 saffron strands that have crushed.

You can easily crush saffron strands between your fingers or use a small mortar if you prefer.

I also added about 2 to 3 teaspoons of sugar and you can see the difference in the consistency in the photo below. Addition of sugar makes the consistency slightly thinner in the mango pulp.

Note that saffron is optional and omit if you do not have it. Additionally you could add ¼ teaspoon of ground ginger (dry ginger powder) at this step.

aamras in a steel bowl sprinkled with ground cardamom and saffron strands

4. Mix very well. Then pour in a container. Cover the container and chill in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour. Or you can serve straightaway in small bowls.

Serving Suggestions

Serve aamras with Poori. Break the poori and dip it in the aamras scooping some of the delish pulp and eat it.

You can serve it with Roti for a healthier option. You could add your choice of nuts and dry fruits to your aamras.

If adding cashews, then fry or roast cashews until golden and mix it with the aamras.

In summers we serve aamras cold or chilled. To make a cold aamras, either refrigerate the mangoes for a couple of hours or add a few ice cubes while blending the mangoes.

aamras in glass bowl with a few saffron strands on top on a green wooden tray
Tips

Helpful Tips

  • Mangoes: Mostly, the alphonso variety of mango is used for making aam ras. Though you can also make with any sweet juicy mangoes. Just make sure the mangoes are not fibrous.
  • Consistency: I never add any milk or water when preparing aamras as we have it with poori or roti. But if you want you can thin the consistency lightly by adding some water or milk (vegan or dairy).
  • Ground ginger: As a reader has mentioned below in the comments, the Gujarati version of aamras recipe has a bit of dry ginger powder (saunth) added to it. This helps in digestion as the aamras is also topped with a bit of ghee.
  • Ground cardamom: In the Maharashtrian aamras version, cardamom powder is added. I usually add cardamom powder and saffron.
  • Garnish: Aaamras can be topped with some chopped nuts like almonds, cashews or pistachios. Sometimes I also mix the chopped nuts with the aamras.
  • Frozen mangoes: If you have frozen mangoes, then make aamras with them easily. Let the mangoes thaw a bit and then blend them. I make aamras and many mango based desserts with frozen mangoes when the mango season is over. I freeze mangoes every year so that we can enjoy them later.
  • Scaling: Make easily a large batch by including more mangoes.

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top shot of aamras in glass bowl with a few saffron strands on top on a green wooden tray

Aamras Recipe

5 from 8 votes
Aamras is a popular and traditional mango delicacy from the Western Indian states of Maharashtra and Gujarat. Enjoy it as it is or with poori (Indian fried bread).
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 0 mins
Total Time 15 mins

Cuisine Gujarati, Maharashtrian
Course: Desserts
Diet: Gluten Free, Vegan
Difficulty Level: Easy

Servings 4
Units

Ingredients

  • 400 grams mangoes or 2 large alphonso or 3 to 4 kesar mangoes
  • ½ teaspoon cardamom powder (ground cardamom)
  • 1 pinch saffron strands – optional
  • 2 to 3 teaspoons raw sugar or jaggery, as required – optional
  • ¼ teaspoon dry ginger powder (ground ginger) – optional
  • water or milk as required – optional

Instructions

Making aamras

  • Rinse the alphonso mangoes thoroughly in clean water. Drain all the water and dry them with a clean kitchen towel.
  • Peel and chop the mangoes.
  • Add the chopped mangoes to a blender. You can also add some sugar or any other sweetener of choice if the mangoes are slightly tangy or sour.
  • Blend to a smooth pulp.
  • Transfer the mango pulp to a bowl.
  • Add cardamom powder and crushed saffron strands.
  • Mix very well. To thin the consistency slightly, add some milk (dairy or vegan) or water.
  • Pour in a container. Cover the container and chill in the refrigerator for 30 minutes to an hour. Or you can serve straightaway in small bowls.

Serving suggestions

  • Serve aamras with Poori. You can also serve it with Roti for a healthier option. 
  • You could even add your choice of nuts and dry fruits to your aamras. If adding cashews, then fry or roast cashews until golden and mix it with the aamras.
  • In summers we serve aamras cold or chilled. To make a cold aamras, either refrigerate the mangoes for a couple of hours or add a few ice cubes while blending the mangoes.

Notes

  • Mangoes: Mostly, the alphonso variety of mango is used for making aamras. Though you can also make with any sweet juicy mangoes. Ensure the mangoes are not fibrous.
  • Consistency: I do not add any milk or water when preparing aamras as we have it with poori or roti. But if you want you can thin down the consistency by adding some water or milk.
  • Ground ginger: In the Gujarati variation of aamras a bit of dry ginger powder (saunth) is added. This helps in digestion as the aamras is also topped with some ghee.
  • Ground cardamom: In the Maharashtrian version, cardamom powder is added. I usually add cardamom powder and saffron. 
  • Garnish: Aaamras can be topped with some chopped nuts like almonds, cashews or pistachios. Sometimes I also mix the chopped nuts with the aamras.
  • Frozen mangoes: If you have frozen mangoes, then make aamras with easily. Let the mangoes thaw a bit and then blend them.
  • Scaling: Make a large batch of this recipe easily. 

Nutrition Info Approximate values

Nutrition Facts
Aamras Recipe
Amount Per Serving
Calories 61 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 1mg0%
Potassium 173mg5%
Carbohydrates 15g5%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 14g16%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 1082IU22%
Vitamin B1 (Thiamine) 1mg67%
Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) 1mg59%
Vitamin B3 (Niacin) 1mg5%
Vitamin B6 1mg50%
Vitamin C 36mg44%
Vitamin E 1mg7%
Vitamin K 4µg4%
Calcium 12mg1%
Vitamin B9 (Folate) 43µg11%
Iron 1mg6%
Magnesium 11mg3%
Phosphorus 15mg2%
Zinc 1mg7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

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This aamras recipe post from the archives (May 2010) has been republished and updated on 13 April 2021.

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Welcome to Dassana's Veg Recipes. I share vegetarian recipes from India & around the World. Having been cooking for decades and with a professional background in cooking & baking, I help you to make your cooking journey easier with my tried and tested recipes showcased with step by step photos & plenty of tips & suggestions.

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13 Comments

  1. I am a gujarati and I have never had aam ras with elaichi or jaggery added, so this is a new recipe for me. Traditionally. the optional ingredients are ginger powder (soondh), salt and a tsp of ghee on the top. Aam ras can feel heavy after having a few cupfuls and therefore ginger powder helps in its digestion.

    Another variation is adding yogurt to the aam ras. This is called matho. This is useful when there are more people and less ras as the addition of yogurt increases the quantity.

    Non-traditionally, I have seen a little bit of orange juice added to the aam ras.

    1. this recipe of aamras is more maharashtrian style. i know about saunth being added to aamras. thanks for all your inputs and suggestions and also informing me about matho. will try matho for sure.

  2. actually i am a 12 year old girl and was having confusion in making “AAM RAS” for my family.
    THANKS A LOT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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