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poori recipe or puri recipe, how to make pooris | indian poori recipe

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poori recipe with step by step photos and tips. poori or puri is a very popular indian fried bread.

pooris are made with unleavened dough made from whole wheat flour and are usually served with a side potato dish, dry or curried. potatoes and pooris are a made for each other combination. towards the end of the post, i have given a list of the potato as well as other curry recipes below, which goes very well with pooris.

pooris are also served in the north india with a sweet dish sooji halwa and in gujarat and maharashtra with aamras – mango pulp or shrikhand. in bengal region, luchi is very popular. luchi is a variation of poori which is completely made with all purpose flour (maida) and is usually served with bengali dum aloo.

a few other variations of pooris are masala poori (spiced pooris), potato pooris (pooris stuffed with spiced mashed potatoes), meethi poori (sweet pooris) and pooris made with grated vegetables or pureed vegetables.

pooris are an important part of festive occasions as well as made during navratri kanjak pooja. they are often had for breakfast. although, you can prepare pooris with a curry or a sauted veggie dish (sabzi) for lunch or any time of the day. in this post, i have shared the basic method of making pooris.

if you are looking for similar recipes then do check bhatura recipe, kulcha recipe, matar kachori, naan recipe with yeast and naan recipe without yeast.

puri or poori recipe below:

4.14 from 15 votes
poori recipe or puri recipe - makes about 20 to 25 pooris
prep time
10 mins
cook time
30 mins
total time
40 mins
poori - crisp, golden and soft pooris made with whole wheat flour, salt and water.
course: breakfasts
cuisine: indian
servings: 3 -4
author: dassana amit
ingredients (1 cup = 250 ml)
  • 3 cups whole wheat flour or atta
  • 1 teaspoon melted ghee or oil (optional)
  • salt as required
  • water as required
  • oil for deep frying
how to make recipe
making poori dough:
  1. seive the whole wheat flour with salt. add melted ghee or oil.
  2. add little water at a time and knead well to form a dough. the dough should not be soft but a little stiff and tight.
making pooris:
  1. divide the dough into small or medium pieces – about 12-14.
  2. make into medium sized or slightly small balls and roll out into small circles.
  3. heat oil in a deep frying pan or kadai.
  4. when the oil is sufficiently hot then add one poori at a time and fry gently pressing down with the frying spoon or slotted spoon in a circular motion.
  5. turn over when puffed up and fry the poori till golden brown.
  6. serve pooris hot with a vegetable curry or sweet dishes like suji ka halwa ( known as sheera in maharashtra ) or aam ras or aloo tamatar ki sabzi.

recipe notes

tips for preparing poori recipe:

  • the dough should be slightly stiff. this is, so that the while being rolled less amount of wheat flour can be dusted on the pooris. if you use too much of wheat flour for dusting then while deep frying the wheat flour particles get fried and burnt in the oil. these burnt particles then stick to the later batches of pooris that you will fry.
  • to avoid this happening, you have one more option. while rolling, apply a little oil on the poori and then roll. this way, you won't need to dust the rolling board with wheat flour. the oil does the trick and you can easily roll the poori.
  • ensure that the oil is neither too hot nor cold. if hot, the pooris get browned quickly. if not enough hot then the pooris absorb oil and become too oily.
    the pooris should puff while frying. if not, then something has gone wrong. either the dough has not been kneaded well or the pooris have not been rolled out evenly or the oil is not hot enough.
  • you can also add some suji/semolina to the pooris. it makes the poori a little crispier.
  • ajwain seeds can also be added to the wheat flour. ajwain is very helpful in digestion. it is used in pooris as pooris being a heavy food can be difficult to digest at times. in north india they make parathas using ajwain.


lets start step by step puri or poori recipe:

1. seive the whole wheat flour with salt. add melted ghee or oil. add little water at a time and knead well to form a dough with hands or with the help of a stand mixer.

2. the dough should not be soft like the dough of the chappati/roti, but a little stiff and tight.

3. divide the dough into small or medium pieces – about 12-14. make into medium sized or slightly small balls.

4. apply oil to dough ball. the idea of applying oil and not dusting with flour is so that while frying, the oil stays clean and you won’t see dark burnt flour particles inside the oil.

5. roll the dough evenly into circles which are neither too thin nor thick.

6. place the rolled poori in a plate and cover with a clean kitchen towel, so that they don’t dry up.

7. heat oil in a deep frying pan or kadai. when the oil is sufficiently hot, then drop a small dough ball into oil. if the dough ball rises steadily & briskly to the top, then the oil is sufficiently hot to fry the pooris. otherwise, wait till the oil becomes hot before frying the pooris. if the dough ball rises slowly or is still at the bottom, then the oil is cold and if it rises too fast, then the oil is very hot.

8. add one poori at a time. it will puff up soon.

9. once the bottom side is golden, then turn over the poori and fry gently pressing down with the frying spoon or slotted spoon in a circular motion. fry the poori till golden brown all over.

10. remove the poori into paper napkins to remove excess oil. fry all pooris this way. if the oil becomes too hot, then lower the temperature by reducing the flame and vice versa.

11. serve poori hot with a vegetable curry or sweet dishes like aam ras or hot with aloo tamatar ki sabzi or punjabi chole or mathura ke dubki wale aloo or aloo matar curry. if making for picnics or tiffin, then after the pooris have been drained, when still hot or warm, keep them in a casserole. they will stay soft and won’t get dense and chewy.

tips for preparing poori recipe:

  • as i have mentioned earlier, the dough should be slightly stiff. this is, so that the while being rolled less amount of wheat flour can be dusted on the pooris. if you use too much of wheat flour for dusting then while deep frying the wheat flour particles get fried and burnt in the oil. these burnt particles then stick to the later batches of pooris that you will fry.
  • to avoid this happening, you have one more option. while rolling, apply a little oil on the poori and then roll. this way, you won’t need to dust the rolling board with wheat flour. the oil does the trick and you can easily roll the poori.
  • ensure that the oil is neither too hot nor cold. if hot, the pooris get browned quickly. if not enough hot then the pooris absorb oil and become too oily.
  • the pooris should puff while frying. if not, then something has gone wrong….. either the dough has not been kneaded well or the pooris have not been rolled out evenly or the oil is not hot enough.
  • you can also add some suji/semolina to the pooris. it makes the poori a little crispier.
  • ajwain seeds (carom seeds) can also be added to the wheat flour. ajwain is very helpful in digestion. it is used in pooris as pooris being a heavy food can be difficult to digest at times. in north india they make paratha using ajwain.

curry recipes that go very well with pooris are:

punjabi aloo sabzi – homely potato curry made with onions, tomatoes and spices.
jeera aloo – potatoes sauted in cumin and a few other spices.
maharashtrian potato bhaji – sauted potato curry made maharashtrian style.
hotel style veg korma – delicious south indian kurma made with mixed veggies.
kala chana – a dry curry made with black chickpeas and spices.
south indian chickpea curry with coconut – spicy south indian chickpea curry with coconut.
vegetable korma – mix vegetable curry with coconut and spices.
matar paneer – spiced and creamy curry with peas and cottage cheese.
kadala curry – spicy black chickpeas curry from the kerala cuisine. gluten free and vegan recipe.
kala chana curry – mildly spiced black chickpeas curry made in punjabi style.




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This post was last modified on March 26, 2018, 12:52 pm

    Categories Dinner RecipesIndian Breads & ParathasIndian Breakfast RecipesPopular Indian Recipes

View Comments (41)

    • i have posted many chana recipes. use the google search button on left side to search for the chana recipes.

        • hi nikki. make a firm dough. yet the dough should not be dry. there should be enough water in the dough as thats what makes the poori puff. but not as soft like a chapati or roti dough.

  • Hi,

    Could you please tell how to check whether the temperature of oil is proper. Neither too hot nor too cold.

    Thanks for the help.

    • add a small ball from the dough to the oil and if its rises steadily & briskly to the top, then the oil is ready. if the dough rises slowly or is still at the bottom, then the oil is cold and if it rises too fast, then the oil is very hot. hope this helps.

  • Hi dear,

    I have been following your recipes from quite a long time and never got disappointed.

    While going through the photos in this recipe, noticed the dough-maker. I have been searching for one but haven't come across a good option. Please suggest me from where should I buy and which brand and how much does it cost?

    Thanks

    Sonam

    • thanks sonam. the dough maker in the pic is kitchen aid mixer. its a very good mixer for making dough, cake batter and whipping up anything. the product is very good and premium but in india they have a third class customer service. i am telling you this from my own experience dealing with the customer service. since my kitchen aid came with a 2 pin plug its giving shocks now and they have yet to attend to it. its been more than a month now. its an expensive product and you will find the cost on their website - http://www.kitchenaidindia.com/ . just make sure if you purchase here in india, buy with three pin earthed plug.

      there is another atta maker which my mil uses and its good for atta making. they have an option with chapati maker too. but only the atta maker is good. chapatis does not come out good.

  • Great, thanks, can't wait to try it like this..I had a recipe that used another type of flour, and it didn't come out good.

  • Hi Dassana ... I chanced upon your website just today and found it to be huge fun ... not only is it classy and refined, but it also projects Indian food in a manner both elegant and appealing. Your presentations are attractive and the photography delightful..! What comes across clearly is that you love cooking and definitely know your stuff. I'm going to try out some of your recipes starting tomorrow ...
    I plan to send links to this site to American friends and acquaintances who love Indian food and have no idea that real Indian food is not what's found in restaurants. They are also too daunted to try cooking it themselves. Your website can change all that.
    By the way, I've done the food feature of a magazine for some time ... I have a few suggestions for you: I re-formatted and edited some of your recipes ... if you like I could email them to you with some covering notes explaining the changes. If you're open to that, do let me know ...
    Meanwhile ... take care ... and keep going ... you're doing a great job...
    Biba Bhusri, a Punjabi Sikh, living in Bangalore..!

    • thanks biba for this positive feedback and also for recommending the website. i agree that real indian food is not found in many restaurants of the world. yes, please do share your reformatted recipes and suggestions at vegrecipesofindiaATgmailDOTcom. AT is for @ and DOT is for .

  • Dear Dassana,
    I tried your pouri recipe and it was a big hit at the dinning table. In fact we had it with paneer and again the recipe from your site. I didn't have any problem that day to feed my little ones that day. They just loved it and my daughter now asks for it often. Thank you very much for shairing the correct recipe and I hope to explore some other recipes from your site soon. Million thanks and more powers to you! May God Bless you!
    Roshanthie

    • welcome roshanthie. thanks for sharing this positive feedback and your blessings. felt good after reading your comment.

  • Hello Dassana,

    You are the very reason I was able to learn cooking in a short time. Your step-by-step pictures HELPSS A LOT ! Please continue this golden work

    Regards,
    Aparna N

  • 6th Oct 2015: I tried making Puri's along with your chole recipe and they turned out pretty well....they did not fluff up much...hubby n baby were happy to eat :-) Thanks for sharing the recipe

    • thanks again doilyn. the pooris have to be rolled well in a round shape and the thickness should be even. also the oil has to be hot enough. with practice, you will get it. happy cooking :)

    • nisha, i do not use soybean chunks or granules. so won't be able to add soybean recipes.

  • Thank you for these instructions. I constantly fail at poori. Either never puffs up or becomes rubbery. Your recipe helped me make my firstever batch of soft fluffy pooris!

  • Hi, I've tried making these twice from another recipe in a cookbook. The first time, they puffed a little. Second time the dough was too wet, I think and stayed flat. That recipe called for graham flour, which seems to be quite coarse whole wheat. Do you think I should try to grind it finer, or just get regular whole wheat? I am very new to Indian cooking - never even eaten or seen these before. I will try your recipe next time. I would love any advice or tips you could give me, especially about the type of flour. Thanks! :)

    • sandy, the flour has to be fine and not coarse. you can grind them finer. or you can also get regular whole wheat flour. dough should not be sticky. it can be have semi-soft to soft texture. also while rolling, pooris have to be rolled evenly and round. when frying the oil has to be medium hot. when you slid the poori in oil, it will come up on the surface and then start puffing up. so gently nudging with a spoon helps pooris to puff up well. depending on the size of pan, you can easily fry 1 to 3 pooris at a time. hope these tips help.

      • I got regular whole wheat flour today, got the dough right & rolled evenly. Some were not 100% round. All puffed somewhat, but 2 puffed all the way! I was cheering like a lunatic in my kitchen when the first one puffed right. (I made smaller batch as practice). They all taste great, but the texture of the ones that puffed all the way is amazing! I am completely hooked! Im gong to make more tomorrow & try to make them rounder.
        Thank you so much for the help! I really appreciate it. My hubby loved them, too. Can't wait to make again.

        • thats great sandy. not all puff. it depends on the way the pooris are rolled and also the temperature of the oil. definitely the puffed ones taste better. even i become a lunatic when a recipe which has given me problems in the past become successful after some trials 🙂

          thanks again and happy cooking.

    • firstly knead the dough well. then the dough balls have to be rolled evenly. the oil has to be at the right temperature while frying puris. i usually fry at a medium to medium-high flame. on a low flame or if the oil is not hot, the puris won't puff up and absorb more oil. the amount of water has to be right in the dough. so a slight softer dough is also fine for making puris.

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